Why You Need to Resolve to Do Better in 2017

With 2016 coming to a close, it’s time for practice owners to reflect on their hospital’s performance over the past 12 months and outline ways to improve in 2017.

Similar to personal resolutions, business resolutions are professional goals that serve to guide your business decisions through the year.

These resolutions should be scaled to the size of the practice and, more importantly, they should be achievable.

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9 Ways to Show Thanks to Your Vet Staff and Clients

Anytime is a great time to tell clients and employees “Thank you,” but doing it during the holidays is a particularly special moment. The words can be powerful and make a lasting impact because they leave the receiver feeling valued and appreciated.

First, hearing “Thank you” is a great motivator that acknowledges what the recipient has done, even if the action was expected. Feeling appreciated is a motivator, too, and what easier way to inspire somebody than to say thank you for something that was done?

Second, appreciation is critical to relationships, which we all understand are important in business. When employees or clients feel underappreciated, chances are that sooner or later they will look for employment or care elsewhere.

Here are nine ways to thank clients and employees this holiday season so you leave them feeling valued, appreciated and ready to help your practice succeed in 2017. Continue reading

Gotta Catch ‘Em All: How Pokémon Go can Lure in New Clients

A mobile game hit the market by storm in July. Within one week it attracted over 15 million players, earned its developer a reported $1.6 million a day and quickly became the hottest game since Candy Crush.

The record-shattering app? Pokémon Go.

Players download the game onto a mobile device before they enter an augmented reality where their physical location and device camera are used to display animated Pokémon creatures all around them.

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All About Zoo and Aquarium Vets

Veterinarians work hands-on with all types of animals every day. Some treat cats and dogs, while others care for exotic animals like camels and tigers, perform surgery on goldfish, or assist in programs to rebuild the populations of endangered species.

June is National Zoo and Aquarium Month, a time to honor the people and institutions that play a crucial role in conserving, researching and keeping healthy exotic and endangered animals. Each year, over 181 million individuals visit zoos and aquariums—more guests than the combined attendance for the NFL, NBA, NHL and major league baseball.

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Weather Warming Up? Time to Talk About Ticks

The rise in outdoor temperatures is a sure sign that spring is here, and with the change come ticks.

When the weather warms it’s safe to assume that ticks are out looking for their next meal. Although the arachnids are found throughout the United States, deer ticks, also known as blacklegged ticks, are common carriers of Lyme disease. They often are found in wooded areas and along forest trails, primarily where their preferred host, the white-tailed deer, is located.

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How to Recognize Animal Abuse

vpn-animal-abuseAnimal cruelty is an unfortunate, horrific reality involving innocent beings that are unable to speak up for themselves. Veterinary professionals have a moral, ethical and, in some states, legal obligation to be the voice for these victims.

Animal cruelty is a catchall statement for offenses that include neglect, abuse, abandonment, animal fighting and even practicing veterinary medicine without a license. State laws vary in whether animal cruelty is deemed a misdemeanor or a felony, and they even go so far as to detail which animals are included. For example, New York laws cover “every living creature except a human being,” while in Alaska, protected animals include vertebrates but not fish.

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How to Have ‘The Talk’ on End-of-Life Care

dog-vpnOne of the most difficult conversations to have in the veterinary industry is “the talk”—the end-of-life and euthanasia discussion.

How does one approach clients to tell them their beloved companion must cross the rainbow bridge after 15 or more years together? How does a veterinary practitioner discuss options or bring up memorial keepsakes? What do you do if euthanizing is the only ethical and humane option but the client doesn’t want to let go?

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